Journal Entry

Six people on a bus driving through a town of the dead.  Andrea, … All hell I can’t get anything out.  My wife’s upset at me.  I’m tired… I really want to write but I can’t figure a think out.
“I’ve worked for the man for a decade and haven’t seen him do that”  from Medium 5/4/09

“It’s kind of refreshing not having to worry about the dead anymore”

A car, black in color, approaches a ranch-style two story house.  He drags along a rolling suitcase filled with cleaning tools.  He steps slowly over several steps and approaches the front door.  He opens the door slowly to reveal the body of a young woman bathed in blood lying on the floor.

“Sir, it’s a simple question”

Journal Entry 3-24

 Excerpt from http://www.webook.com/project/The-Kingboro-Epic

(“Do we just leave everyone? We have patients still in rooms. We have staff we need to notify.”

“Well, we better start doing something…”

A muffled argument burst from the end of the hall. Suddenly glass burst outward from a glass door. Someone fell through it. Dr. Stein and Kerry ran toward the commotion. The victim, a man 30 years old wearing a dress shirt and pants, sat unmoving within the door. Dr. Kreese stood by his desk talking on the phone. )

 “Whatever,” said Dr. Kreese loudly, “your not the one that brought this company out of the trash heap.  No I’m not going to calm down.” 

The normally calm demenor of the current CEO was replaced by an angry slur. 

“Is he drunk?”  Kerry asked quietly. 

“I don’t know,” Dr. Stein replied. 

A woman screamed and the two men looked down the hall.  A large man dragged a woman from one of the office’s.  The beast of a man was muscular and naked-chested.  He pulled her by her long brunette curls. 

“Is that one of the patients?”  Kerry asked.

“I’ll assume so.”

Dr. Stein moved toward the large muscular man slowly, bravely.  The screaming woman noticed him approaching.

“Help me,” she shouted and Dr. Stein jumped.  He had become focused in thought.  The large muscular man looked toward him and growled.  The growl was frighteningly canine-like.  The man’s face and eyes were contorted showing large muscular mounds along his jawline.  His neck was thick as an old Oak tree and his arms were the large branches.  He continued to drag the woman out of the doorway as he growled. 

The woman, who Dr. Stein now recognized as Rebecca Dilley, struggled.  She pleaded with Dr. Stein to help her but he hadn’t a clue of what to do to accomplish that.  The large muscular man seemed primal.  It was doubtful he would even understand language. 

Kerry stepped up from behind him and shouted, “Hey, dumbass…let go of the girl.” 

The large muscular man growled loudly and dropped the woman.  He then, within seconds, grasp Kerry by the throat and twisted.  Kerry’s neck broke easily and he became limp.  The muscular man threw Kerry down the hallway and into the wall at the end.  He looked down at the woman but Dr. Stein had managed to assist her up and out of the way.  They both stood in front of Dr Kreese’s office.  Blood from the man in the door pooled on the floor making it slick.  The large muscular man growled again and approached slowly.

Storm beginning

The storm echoed through the steel warehouse structure.  The booms of thunder increased in volume as the sound bounced through empty partitioned halls.

Dr. Stein sat alone in the executive break room.  Within the room sat a small closet, which served as a bathroom; a sink, microwave and refrigerator.  It was nothing to proud of.  The building itself was a piece of crap.  Why the hell would a research corporation move into an abandoned warehouse was unknown to Dr. Stein.

Thunder boomed through the walls, then another followed by several more loud crashes.  The lights flickered but Dr. Stein ignored it and poored himself another cup of coffee.  He sat upon the light brown over stuffed couch.  Minutes later, a young intern burst through the break room door.

“We’ve got a problem,” the intern said in a panic.

Research

“Brain pacemakers” are used to treat people who suffer from epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, major depression and other diseases. The pacemaker is a medical device that is implanted into the brain to send electrical signals into the tissue. Depending on the area of the brain that is targeted, the treatment is called deep brain stimulation, or cortical stimulation. Brain stimulation may be used both in treatment and prevention. Pacemakers may also be implanted outside the brain, on or near the spinal cord (spinal cord stimulation), and around cranial nerves such as the vagus nerve (vagus nerve stimulation), and on or near peripheral nerves. Ref… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain_pacemaker

Journal Entry–The house 1

Let’s see…
Walking into the house–
…The door creaked open as Dr. Stein stepped into the dark house. He was cautious because of what happened at the Company. So many times he was caught off guard by those zombies. He was almost eaten three, no four times. Once was too much to consider but four times. Derrick, Nancy, and Andrea followed close behind.
“Do you really think this is going to do us any good?” Nancy asked in a nervous tone.
“It’s either hide in hear and have a slight chance they won’t know or wander around the streets with them following us,” Derrick replied.
“I don’t like either choice,” Nancy said.
“Do we want to go upstairs or down?” Derrick asked to anyone that wanted to answer.
“I think we will be safer downstairs,” said Andrea as she stood in the doorway staring out into the incoming darkness. “I don’t like how we can’t see them coming in the dark.
“You need to close the door,” Nancy insisted, her nerves unraveling. “I want to know where they are,” Andrea snapped, her nerves not 100% either.
“We all need to find a place to hide for the night,” said Dr. Stein. He was level headed on the outside but his insides were melting quickly. 

“I’m going upstairs,” Derrick said as he began toward the stairs. 

“Don’t you think we should lock ourselves in the basement?”  Andrea asked but implied with her fallen brow that Derrick should go downstairs. 

“I think it’s safer upstairs.” 

“No, Derrick– go downstairs,” Andrea pleaded. 

“Think about it,” Derrick began, “We lock ourselves downstairs in the dark.  The only entrance and exit is in the hallway, or where ever it is.  The zombies are going to smell us and know we are down stairs.  They are going to work and work on that one door till they break it down.  Once they break it down, what are we going to do?  Fight them off.  I don’t think I’ll be staying downstairs.  I’d rather be upstairs where there are windows I can jump to my death from.” 

Dr. Stein stepped from the kitchen.  “I found the door to the basement.  It’s a solid door and we can barracade it from behind.  I’m hoping there is no celler that will allow them an entrance from there too.  There should be food rations down there that we can live off of for a week or so.” 

Derrick smiled slightly, uncomfortably, “What world do you live in Dr. Stein?  Food rations in the basement.  This isn’t World War II.  I am going to barracade myself in a upstairs room, or maybe the attic.  I think I’ll have better luck.” 

“You do what you want Derrick,” Dr. Stein said, with disappointment, “Whoever wants to hide in the basement can come with me.” 

“Don’t go up there, Derrick,” Andrea pleaded. 

“You should come with me,” said Derrick, “I will need some company.”  He then smiled and left to find the stairs without looking back. 

Andrea, Nancy and Dr. Stein disappeared into the kitchen.

How do I start this tonight…I have ten fifteen minutes only…
I’ve got my ending idea…I need to write the house idea…
…chased to the two story house across from the company.
The large moving fence fell as the four walk backward across the empty street

Newest Update (The Beginning)

Andrea
Andrea Tomlinson sat quietly next to the aisle in the dirty bus. An empty seat sat to the left of her. She sat near the center of the bus. She never liked sitting too close to the front or the back. She watched as the driver of the bus bounced up and down and left and right listening to tunes that bled into his ears from earphones. He seemed a little too happy to be driving a city bus in a depressed little town like Kingsboro.
Kingsboro was always a podunk little town stuck in the south central palm of Michigan. Jobs were moving out and economy was quickly getting worse. The residents fought over the reason. It was the president, it was the governor, it was killer bees from Mexico—Andrea really didn’t care why the town was falling apart she was only interested in finding a job.
Through the large bus windshield she watched as a young man, cute from a distance of 20 yards, stood at a bus stop. He had his hands in his pockets and watched as the bus approached. Andrea noticed his hair was trimmed short and he wore an ironed shirt and pants. They were not starched but neat.
“He looks like a recent military veteran,” she thought. That gave him extra cuteness points.
The bus stopped with a jolt and the front door opened. The man— the young veteran walked in and immediately smiled.
“Did he see something he liked?” She thought curiously then it hit her. She was staring at the man. He thought she like him. She looked down at her naked knees. She adjusted her short red skirt and shuffled her coordinated heels upon the dirty bus floor.
“How are you doing?” The man asked as Andrea pretended not to she him. “May I sit here?”
Andrea said nothing and just stared at her knees.
“Miss?” He asked.
He said “Miss”. She added a couple more points then looked up. He had a nice face, thin and sculpted. His eyes were young and blue and his hair was brown.
“May I sit here?” He asked again.
“Yes, sure,” She said with a nervousness that was surely noticeable.
“Thanks,” he said and stepped over her knees and slid into the seat next to the window.
As soon as he sat down he began to ramble. Something about computers and processors and how difficult it was. The man’s points whittled away as he pronounced each three to four syllable word over and over. The man continued to babble until the bus jolted to a stop again. Andrea stood and stepped out into the aisle way. A woman she did not see almost ran into her from behind. Andrea apologized quickly and walked toward the front of the bus. The man followed close behind. She had hoped he would of stayed on the bus but what could she do. Another man unavoidably attracted to her and she would have to deal with it.
Nancy
Nancy Smith, sat in the back of a dirty city bus. In front of her sat several other passengers going about their business of laughing, joking and whatnot. The temperature of the bus always seemed to reach ten or twenty degrees higher then the temperature outside. Today is was 82 degrees.
“It would be nice to have a steady job, a steady paycheck and a steady place to live,” she thought.
She received the e-mail several days ago.
Looking for a nurse to care for patients at a research center. Interested in individuals that enjoy a challenge, or want to make a difference in peoples lives. No background check. 1 to 2 years experience.
Nancy wanted to make a difference but it wasn’t what interested her. It was the no background check. She had a checkered past that seemed to follow her. She was never at a job for longer then 3 months, if she even got the job.
“Don’t think about that,” she warned herself sternly, “maybe this is the one.”
Hope filled some of her empty heart but the stern look on the judge’s face and the reluctant verdict fought to take any hopeful gains away from her.
“I wasn’t convicted of a crime,” she thought, “it wasn’t a crime. I did the right thing.”
The bus slowed then stopped with a jolt. The driver laughed loudly. His gleeful cackle bounced throughout the steel and glass walls of the bus. Nancy stood up quickly. She began toward the front of the bus to tell the driver what she thought of his joke when a woman step out into the aisle in front of her. Nancy stopped centimeters from the back of the woman’s head. The woman’s blond hair brushed her face as she turned to apologize. Nancy smiled and accepted her apology. She allowed the blond woman and the man she sat with to move into the aisle and move toward the front of the bus. Nancy followed them out of the bus and was certain that she was going to say something to the driver. She approached the driver but only scowled at him. The driver smiled, the center two teeth under his top lip were missing and he seemed to have a corneal ulcer in his right eye. The infection, usually caused by a bacterium, caused the eye to look cloudy. Nancy smiled back, she again wanted to say something to the driver but she could not. She stood staring at his eye.
“Is there a problem?” The driver asked with noticeable uncomfort then looked forward through the front windshield.
“I’m sorry,” Nancy said, “I noticed your eye and wanted to recommend you get it treated.”
“Your so kind,” the driver said sharply, “I’m going to close the door are you getting out?” Nancy had offended him and she immediately felt awful. She turned and walked ashamed down the bus steps. She stepped upon the ground and the driver closed the door. The door slid closed with a thump that startled Nancy. “Was this how her day was going to start?”
A familiar Cadillac sat ahead of her. There was a large dent just behind the passenger door.
“Obviously, Dr. Stein still didn’t notice my accident two weeks ago,” she smiled slightly then stopped.
“Is he working here too? I think I see him sitting in the driver’s seat. I should see if he’s ok.”
Dr. Daniel Stein
Sitting in his car, Dr. Daniel Stein, recently retired from Kingsboro Mercy Hospital, thumbs through the Kingsboro Times.
He laid the paper down upon the passenger seat and glanced out the windshield at the bland, gray rectangle that was the Kingsboro Research and Development Co. He glanced at his watch—another twenty minutes to go.
He went over in his mind all that had happened in the last weeks. There had been the purchase of the hospital by Dallas Truman, a local real estate tycoon, the thorough investigation and analysis by the FBI, then the appearance of what would be called a freak.
Dr. Stein stared out the windshield wondering why his life had taken such a strange unexpected turn. He disappeared into thought and the busy hallways of the Kingsboro Mercy Hospital replaced the bland exterior of his new job.
“Can you believe they are going to force me out,” Dr. Stein had said with disbelief as he walked quickly through the hospital front hall with Andy Koffman. Andy was still a resident but when they met for the first time they became quick friends.
“I’m so sorry they are treating you like this Daniel,” Andy said
“I just don’t understand why? I’ve been here 25 years and you are barely a doctor.” Said Dr. Stein.
“We may never understand—,” Andy began but never finished. A large argument ensured behind the white curtain an ER triage unit. Soon something burst and left a dark stain upon the curtain. Andy and Dr. Stein began toward it when an irate patient, covered in blood, stepped from the curtain. He looked at Dr. Stein, his expression deadpan and his eyes cloudy. He then thrust his arms out and felt for a heavy wooden chair that sat outside the unit. He grasped it and with enormous strength tossed it at the two men. Dr. Stein ducked and fell to the floor. The heavy chair hit Andy full in the chest and he collapsed under it. Dr. Stein looked back to see his friend unconscious, under the chair. He began to stand when an IV line, with pole attached, just missed his head. Several people, staff, patients and security converged and surrounded the man. Three men in black suits burst into the ER from the right of the patient and grabbed him. The man threw them off him easily then proceeded toward the nurse’s station. He tore it apart. The large desk portions he through over his head. The chairs, he threw, flew with such force that anyone caught with one was dead. Dr. Stein lay on the floor looking back. Andy lay under the large chair still motionless.
“He’s probably dead,” Dr. Stein, said to himself as he began to slide backward to get a better look. Paper and computer equipment flew across the room. A flat screen computer monitor hit a surgeon in scrubs dumb enough to run across the hallway. The monitor hit him in the side of the head and broke his neck. The noise was disturbing. A loud crack and the surgeon fell to the floor. The three black suited men stood against a hallway wall not moving. They looked terrified, scared to even move a muscle. The people that initially gathered had all but left. The hallway was empty except for Dr. Stein, three men in suits and bodies’ dead or unconscious. After the nurse’s desk had been destroyed and thrown over the hall the man fell to his knees and then fell forward. Dr. Stein, stood and pulled the chair from on top of Andy. Andy’s chest was sunken and his face was mangled but he was alive.
“Someone get me a gurney,” he shouted. A nurse appeared from a far room and grabbed the first one she could find. She quickly pushed it up the Dr. Stein and they preceded gather Andy up. The three suited men, stood against the wall for a short time longer then rushed over to the irate patient. They talked quickly and seemed to be smiling.
“What the hell are they smiling at,” Dr. Stein said loudly. The nurse hadn’t heard him. She began to push Andy toward a room. Dr. Stein stood watching the men. They were inspecting the man as he sat face first on the ground.
“Dr. Stein?” Said the nurse.
The drab building, Kingsboro Research and Development Co., reappeared. A thin woman with long red hair stood outside Dr. Stein’s car.
“Dr. Stein, your going to be late,” she said with a smile.
Dr. Stein looked at his watch and it was five minutes to 5:00 in the morning.
“Oh, hell,” and he opened his drivers door. He straightened his black tie and began to walk quickly toward the building. He stopped and looked back. The redheaded woman was walking toward a large city bus. The driver stood outside the front door smoking a cigarette.

Character Paragraphs

Sitting in his car, Dr. Daniel Stein, recently forcibly retired from Kingsboro Mercy Hospital, thumbs through the Kingsboro Times.
He laid the paper down upon the passenger seat and glanced out the windshield at the bland rectangle that was the Company. He glanced at his watch—another twenty minutes to go.
He went over in his mind all that had happened in the last couple days. There had been the purchase of the hospital by an unknown billionaire—his thorough vexing of all hospital staff. The appearance of what would be called a freak, and his untimely termination or retirement.
(fix this) Untimely termination—
“Who terminates a 35-year veteran on an argument about treatment,” he said to himself as he stepped from the car.
He closed the car door and straightened his black tie. He buttoned his white Kingboro Mercy Hospital coat due to a brisk wind and began toward the building.
The Company had called him 24 hours after he was let go. They offered him a job at half the pay.
“Why would you take that?” He asks.
Dr. Stein thought about this for several minutes as continued to walk toward the building. The buildings exterior was gray painted bricks. Its roof was flat, for the most part. The aluminum slates that made up the roof were curled on each end.
He had no answer—Dr. Stein just seemed to resign to the pressure of working. He had always enjoyed just working. The money was just a bonus. The Company offered a bit of a challenge. Work in a research environment. Care for patients with unknown illnesses. Make a difference. These short sentences said it all. Especially the last one, make a difference. Dr. Stein had been trying to make a difference for years but he got caught up in all the politics entwined into the hospital system.
II
Nancy Smith, sat in the back of a dirty city bus. In front of her sat several other passengers going about their business of laughing, joking and whatnot. The temperature of the bus always seemed to reach ten or twenty degrees higher then the temperature outside. Today is was 82 degrees.
“It would be nice to have a steady job, a steady paycheck and a steady place to live,” she thought.
She received the e-mail several days ago.
Looking for a nurse to care for patients at a research center. Interested in individuals that enjoy a challenge, or want to make a difference in peoples lives. No background check. 1 to 2 years experience.
Nancy wanted to make a difference but it wasn’t what interested her. It was the no background check. She had a checkered past that seemed to follow her. She was never at a job for longer then 3 months, if she even got the job.
“Don’t think about that,” she warned herself sternly, “maybe this is the one.”
Hope filled some of her empty heart but the stern look on the judge’s face and the reluctant verdict fought to take any hopeful gains away from her.
“I wasn’t convicted of a crime,” she thought, “it wasn’t a crime. I did the right thing.”
The bus slowed then stopped with a jolt. The driver laughed loudly. His gleeful cackle bounced throughout the steel and glass walls of the bus. Nancy stood up quickly. She began toward the front of the bus to tell the driver what she thought of his joke when a woman step out into the aisle in front of her. Nancy stopped centimeters from the back of the woman’s head. The woman’s blond hair brushed her face as she turned to apologize. Nancy smiled and accepted her apology. She allowed the blond woman and the man she sat with to move into the aisle and move toward the front of the bus. Nancy followed them out of the bus. She was certain that she was going to say something but when she approached the driver she only scowled at him. The driver smiled, the center two teeth under his top lip were missing and he seemed to have a corneal ulcer in his right eye. The infection was caused by a bacterium and caused the eye to look cloudy. Nancy smiled back, she wanted to say something to the driver but she could not. She kept staring at his eye.
“Is there a problem?” The driver asked then looked forward through the front windshield.
“I’m sorry,” Nancy said, “I noticed your eye and wanted to recommend you get it treated.”
“Your so kind,” the driver said sharply, “I’m going to close the door are you getting out?” Nancy had offended him and she immediately felt awful. She turned and walked ashamed down the bus steps. She stepped upon the ground and the driver closed the door. The door slid closed with a thump that startled Nancy. “Was this how her day was going to start?” She asked herself concerned greatly that her day was going to snowball downhill from here.
III
Andrea Tomlinson sat quietly next to aisle in the dirty bus. An empty seat sat to the left of her. She sat near the center of the bus. She never liked sitting to close to the front or the back. She watched as the driver of the bus bounced up and down and left and right listening to tunes that bled into his ears from earphones. He seemed a little too happy to be driving a city bus in a depressed little town like Kingsboro.
Kingsboro was always a podunk little town stuck in the south central palm of Michigan. Jobs were moving out and economy was quickly getting worse. The residents fought over the reason. It was the president, it was the governor, it was killer bees from Mexico—Andrea really didn’t care why the town was falling apart she was only interested in finding a job.
Through the large bus windshield she watched as a young man, cute from a distance of 20 yards, stood at a bus stop. He had his hands in his pockets and watched as the bus approached. Andrea noticed his hair was trimmed short and he wore an ironed shirt and pants. They were not starched but neat.
“He looks like a recent military veteran,” she thought. That gave him extra cuteness points.
The bus stopped with a jolt, as the driver often did, and the front door opened. The man— the young veteran walked in and immediately smiled.
“Did he see something he liked?” She thought curiously then it hit her. She was staring at the man. He thought she like him. She looked down at her naked knees. She adjusted her short red skirt and shuffled her coordinated heels upon the dirty bus floor.
“How are you doing?” The man asked as Andrea pretended not to she him. “May I sit here?”
Andrea said nothing and just stared at her knees.
“Miss?” He asked.
He said “Miss”. She added a couple more points then looked up. He had a nice face, thin and sculpted. His eyes were young and blue and the hair, that he had, was brown.
“May I sit here?” He asked again.
“Yes, sure,” She said with a nervousness that was surely noticeable.
“Thanks,” he said and stepped over her knees and slid into the seat next to the window.
As soon as he sat down he began to ramble. Something about computers and processors and how difficult it was. The man’s points whittled away as he pronounced each three to four syllable word over and over. The man continued to babble until the bus jolted to a stop again. Andrea stood and stepped out into the aisle way. A woman she did not see almost ran into her from behind. Andrea apologized quickly and walked toward the front of the bus. The man followed close behind. She had hoped he would of stayed on the bus but what could she do. Another man unavoidably attracted to her and she would have to deal with it.

Chapter 1 re-edit Sept 08

Kingsboro Epic

Chapter 1– New Employees

The long dark hallway just inside the entrance to The Company was quiet at 7:59. As the seconds ticked by the darkness prepared for the new day.

8:00 began the workday. A large steel blue door opened and light illuminated the hallway in front of it. The florescence lights above the hallway lit up and the day began.

Derrick Adams, Eric Hoyt, Dr. Daniel Stein, Nancy Smith and Andrea Alexander walked through the dark blue door and into the nondescript hallway. They stood together off to the left of the door.

“Did you notice no one walked to the left down this hallway?” Andrea Alexander said, as she watched 200 or so people walk to the right into a maze of perpendicular hallways.

Nancy Smith, stood beside Andi and look to the left down the hallway. She noticed a single door painted darkly at the end of the hall. There was a small bulb lit above the door. No other doors are within the hall, just faded plaster walls and a paint strip down the center of the floor.

Nancy brushed long brunette hair from her face and answered, “I wouldn’t call it a strange thing.”

The rest of the group looked to the left and stared into the hallway. Curiosity peeked like a child in the refrigerator.

“How’s it going?” Said a voice from behind them. The group jumped in unison and turned toward the voice. A small Latino man dressed in a sharp black suit and light blue shirt approached the group smiling.

“Derrick Adams, Eric Hoyt, Dr. Stein, Nancy Smith and Andrea Alexander,” he began professionally.

“I’m Dr. Ruiz. Follow me,” he said.

“Wait,” Andrea Alexander asked then added. “What’s down that hallway? No one walked down that way.”

Dr. Ruiz hesitated slightly, “There are some storage rooms and other rooms that aren’t used,” he said.

“But there is only one room down there,” she countered.

“Lets continue,” Dr. Ruiz stated, ignoring her comment.

The first hallway was on the left. It was well lit with several people walking in and out. Derrick Adams, the new resident IT specialist, spotted a man standing by himself outside a doorway on the right.

“Hey, what’s going on Kerry,” Derrick said.

The man looked. The large sacks under his eyes were drooping and wrinkles were prominent upon his middle-aged face. When he saw Derrick he smiled and waved.

“You know that man,” said Eric Hoyt sharply. He was a large man with a square jaw. He fit better in the Secret Service then in a Research and Development company.

“Why do you ask?” Said Derrick suspiciously.

“Don’t know,” replied Eric Hoyt, “just curious.”

A muffled argument burst from an opening door at the end of the hall. Suddenly, the glass within the door burst outward and a man in black slacks fell through it. Everyone within eyesight gasp but no one went to investigate. The man sat unmoving within the door. A door burst open from somewhere and men rushed out into the halls. The clamor of heavy leather boots announced introduced the Company guards. The guards pushed through Dr. Ruiz and the group of new employees. They rushed up the hall and stood in front of the door at the end of the hall.

Doctor Ruiz stepped in front of the group. “The conference room is in the last hallway…” He began.

“…all the way to the right, down the hall. Go in and pick a chair. I’ll meet you in a few.”

Dr. Ruiz walked toward the commotion. The group stood watching for several minutes then, lead by the women, they began to walk down toward the conference room. They said little till they sat in the conference room.

The conference room was a large room, lit brightly, with four tables pushed together in the center of the room. Three black overstuffed chairs were pushed neatly under each table. Nancy Smith and Derrick Adams entered first and walked around the table. Nancy Smith sat on the left and Derrick Adams on the right. Andrea Alexander, Dr. Stein and Eric Hoyt came in last and sat closest to the door.

“What brings you here, Andrea?” Nancy Smith said trying to avoid talking about the situation down the hall.

“I’m not really interested in small talk,” Andrea said with no contempt but no interest in the conversation, “I want to know what happened down the hall.”

“It simply looked like an argument,” said Dr. Stein.

The group looked at him. He was the oldest of the group. He wore a white doctor’s coat with a small insignia on the right chest.

“Your probably right,” Andrea said.

“Alright, group,” said Dr. Ruiz as he stood within the doorway, “Let’s get this started.”

The meeting lasted only 30 minutes. Dr. Ruiz explained the history of the company; it’s procedures and safety guidelines. He introduced the head of each department by picture only. He intended to have them visit but because of the commotion they were not available. He dismissed the group and they left for their perspective positions.

Derrick Adams stood outside the door of the conference room waiting for Gary Minux. He was head of IT for The Company.

Gary Minux stepped from the main hallway and began toward Derrick.

“Hi, welcome to the Company,” said the man. He was a small man with a large forehead and thin hair. He spoke in a quiet, almost bored tone.

“My name is Gary Minux and I am the Technology Director. Come with me,” he said.